TBNC CASE STUDY
REPRESENTATIONAL PLANNING, ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL & TECHNOLOGY EXHIBITS

 

TBNC dgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek Large Scale Environmental Planning Exhibit, Pala Creek, California USA

PROTOTYPICAL
Large Scale Project Entitlement, Very Rich Oak Riparian Habitat Enhancement & Site Development Program

 

 

Milda's Neighbors & Their Successful Ventures

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Southerly Neighbors The Pala Band of Mission Indians, Great Successes, Pala Creek, California USA

www.palatribe.com

 

BRIEF CULTURAL REPORT

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's neighbors the Pala Native Community at Pala Creek, Southern California USA

The Pala Band of Mission Indians is located in northern San Diego County, where a majority of the 918 enrolled members live on their 12,273-acre reservation, established for Cupeño and Luiseño Indians, who consider themselves to be one proud people — Pala.

The Cupeños

The word Cupeño is of Spanish derivation, adopting the native place-name Kupa and appending Spanish — "eño" to mean a person who lives in or hails from Kupa. The Cupeños, however, called themselves Kuupangaxwichem, or "people who slept here." The Cupans were one of the smallest native American tribes in Southern California. It is unlikely that they ever numbered more than 1000 in size. They once occupied a territory 10 square miles in diameter in a mountainous region at the headwaters of the San Luis Rey River in the valley of San Jose de Valle.


Many of the Pala Indians trace their heritage back to Cupa. Today, more than 90 years after having been expelled from their native homeland, the Cupeños call Pala, California home and live as one among the Luiseño tribe.

SOVEREIGNTY

Indian tribes existed as sovereign governments long before European settlers arrived in North America. Treaties signed with European nations and later the United States in exchange for land guaranteed the tribes continued recognition and treatment as sovereigns.

Sovereignty is an internationally recognized power of a nation to govern itself. Treaties were agreements between sovereigns that granted peace, alliances, trade, and land rights to the newcomers. Tribal governments used treaties to confirm and retain such rights as the sovereign right of self-government, fishing and hunting rights and jurisdictional rights over their lands. Treaties did not, as is commonly assumed, grant rights to Indians from the United States. Tribes ceded certain rights to the United States and reserved rights they never forfeited.

Tribal sovereignty preceded the development of the United States Constitution. The framers of the Constitution specifically recognized the sovereignty of Indian tribes in Article I, section 8, clause 3 which identified Congress as the governmental branch authorized to regulate commerce with "foreign nations, among the several states, and with the Indian tribes."

 

BRIEF ENTERPRISE REPORT

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Good Neighbors Southerly, The Pala Band of Mission Indians and Their Great New Entertainment Centre at the San Luis Rey River, Pala, California USA

www.palacasino.com

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Southerly Neighbors The Pala Indians and Their Nice New Entertainment Centre at the San Luis Rey River, Southern California USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Good Neighbors Southerly and Their Nice New Entertainment Centre at the San Luis Rey River, Pala, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Good Southerly Neighbors the Pala Band of Mission Indians and Their Great New Entertainment Centre at the San Luis Rey River, North San Diego County, California USA

Grand Entry View Southeasterly

Representational Interior Elements

Resort Pool & Patio Spa Elements

 

Experience The Excitement Of Pala Time

Some of the most exciting Pala moments happen under the spotlights of our 4 state-of-the-art entertainment venues. From the intimate style of Infinity, to the open-air grandeur of the Palomar Starlight Theater, Pala is certain to have a perfect show and a perfect venue for you.

Rejuvenate And Relax The Mind And Body

The Pala Spa combines entertainment and relaxation to create an environment that promotes health and rejuvenation. Set against the tranquil backdrop of the Palomar Mountains, the Pala Spa, with 14 treatment rooms including two Couples Suites, a state-of-the-art fitness center, a full-service salon, and a retail boutique delivers a perfect getaway just for you.

Indulge In Culinary Excellence

Pala Time doesn’t have to stop after you cash in. Just make any one of our 10 fabulous restaurants part of your visit. One taste, and you’ll understand why we say “There Are So Many Ways To Win® At Pala”.

 

 

 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Northerly Neighbors the Pechanga Indian Nation, Pala Creek, California USA

www.pechanga-nsn.gov

 

BRIEF CULTURAL REPORT

 


TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors to the North, The Pechanga Indian Nation, and Their Greta New Entertainment Centre just up Pala Creek, Pechanga Indian nation USA

THE MISSION INDIAN FEDERATION
circa 1920
An Association of fifty-one [51] tribes from Southern California
organized to defend tribal sovereignty and promote self-governance

The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians has called the Temecula valley home for more than 10,000 years. Life on earth began in this valley, Exva Temeeku, the place of the union of Sky— father, and Earth— mother (Tuukumit'pi Tamaayowit). The Temecula Indians (Temeekuyam) lived at Temeekunga— the place of the sun. And 10,000 years from now, tribal elders will share with tribal youth as they do today the story of the tribe's creation.

The payomkowishum, or Luiseño People were nearly destroyed by events and actions from first contact with Spanish Missionaries. Turbulent times continued with the eviction of our tribe from traditional lands in the 1870s. The Pechanga reservation was established by Executive Order of the President of the United States on June 27, 1882, affirming Pechanga Tribal sovereignty and our land-base.

 

THE MISSIONARIES

In 1798, Spanish Missionaries founded the Mission of San Luis Rey de Francia, forever altering Luiseño tribal life and pressing the Luiseño people into servitude, slavery or imprisonment. The Roman Catholic Church established ranchos that encompassed the native villages. The newcomer Spanish identified the tribes living in the territory claimed for Mission San Luis Rey as Sanluiseños, or simply, Luiseños.

 

THE GREAT OAK

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors to the North, The Pechanga Indian Nation and One Tough Old 1500 Years Quercus, Dood, Edgemon

The largest natural-growing, indigenous live oak tree in the United States,
the Great Oak is estimated to be up to 1,500 years old.

The Great Oak is the largest natural-growing, indigenous coast live oak [Quercus agrifolia]) wi'aashal tree in the United States and is estimated to be anywhere from 850 to 1,500 years old, making it one of the oldest oak trees in the world. The tree has been used by countless generations as a gathering place. The Great Oak area, Wi'aasha, is home to numerous culturally sensitive, historical and archaeological sites, including tribal interment sites from time immemorial.

In April 2003, the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians had 1,000 acres of land put into federal trust by President Bush in 2002, formerly known as the Great Oak Ranch. The successful effort was a product of bi-partisan support from local, state and federal leaders, including among others, U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer, U.S. Representatives Mary Bono, Darrell Issa, and Dale Kildee, State Senators James L. Brulte and Dennis Hollingsworth, and Assembly Member Bill Leonard.

At one level, it would seem that the tribe had simply added land to its reservation. But to the Pechanga people, the land and the Great Oak is of enormous historical and cultural value. Now that it is once again part of the Pechanga Reservation and its people, the Great Oak will remain a symbol of the Tribe's identity for generations to come.

 

 

BRIEF ENTERPRISE REPORT

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Northerly Neighbors the Pechanga Peoples and Their Great Recreational Community, just up Pala Creek, California USA

www.pechanga.com

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors Northerly The Pechanga Indian Nation, and Their Great Edifice just up Pala Creek, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors Northerly The Pechanga Peoples and Their Great Evening Entertainment Venues Up Pala Creek, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors Northerly Up Pala Creek, Wow, They Have a Great Resort, and Big Too, Pala, California USA

The Grand Entry Westerly View

Entertainment & Gaming Elements

Overview of the Resort Edifice

 

The Pechanga Resort and Casino features a spa, nightclub, and entertainment venue, and is approximately 25 miles from Hemet-Ryan Airport, 56 miles from Ontario International Airport, and 61 miles from San Diego International Airport. Local attractions include downtown Temecula, approximately five miles away, and the Promenade in Temecula, located six miles from the property. Hotel amenities include a casino, fitness center, seasonal outdoor pool, sundeck, cabanas, spa, massages, saunas, beauty treatments, shops, eight restaurants, theater, live events, nightclub, bar, and a box office. Guest rooms feature cable TVs, movies on-demand, video games, high-speed Internet access, coffee available, minibars, alarm clocks, hairdryers, irons and ironing boards, bath amenities, and safes.

Designed in a style reminiscent of Frank Lloyd Wright, the architecture of Pechanga Resort & Casino reflects a casual elegance embracing nature and infused with Native American art and culture. Earning the AAA Four Diamond rating award annually since opening in 2002, Pechanga’s status as a recipient of that coveted award evidenced throughout in amenities and service.

A striking porte cochere entry flanked by two water features greets arriving hotel guests who are welcomed into an inviting lobby highlighted by a massive true-to-life oak tree and granite water feature. Met by attentive Front Desk Registration Attendants, guests can observe original art and photographs depicting the culture and history of the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians that accent the lobby area. Other public rooms and hallways are similarly completed by original paintings, baskets and art.

Pechanga hotel guests will find Four Diamond comfort and amenities in each of its 517 spacious guest rooms and suites, including 24-hour room service. Each oversized deluxe room is unique with floor to ceiling windows and an impressive master bath. One bedroom suites offer sitting rooms with a wet bar, separate sleeping quarters and a one-and-a-half bath. Jacuzzi Suites combine the comfort of a deluxe room with an additional cozy sitting room and a full Jacuzzi tub for two. Hotel guests have complimentary use of the fully equipped health club, seasonal pool and sundeck with private cabanas, and a knowledgeable concierge service. Massage therapy is available by appointment at the spa located on the third floor adjacent to the pool and health club.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Successful Neighbors the Rincon Indians Over to the east, Pala Creek, California USA

www.rinconmembers.net

BRIEF CULTURAL REPORT

The Luiseño, or Payomkowishum, are a Native American people who at the time of the first contacts with the Spanish in the 16th century inhabited the coastal area of southern California, ranging 50 miles from the southern part of Los Angeles County to the northern part of San Diego County, and inland 30 miles. In the Luiseño language, the people call themselves Payomkowishum [also spelled Payomkawichum], meaning "People of the West."

The Luiseño people were successful in exploiting a number of natural resources to provide food and clothing. They had a close relationship with their natural environment. They used many of the plants they found, and harvested many kinds of seeds, berries, nuts, fruits, and vegetables for a varied and nutritious diet. The land also provided many different species of animals for hunting. Hunters took antelopes, bobcats, deer, elk, foxes, mice, mountain lions, rabbits, wood rats, river otters, ground squirrels, and a wide variety of insects. The Luiseño used toxins leached from the California buckeye to stupefy fish in order to harvest them in mountain creeks.

 

BRIEF ENTERPRISE REPORT

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors Up The River San Luis Rey to pauma Valley, The Rincon Indian Nation and their New Entertainment Center Harrahs, Pauma Valley, California USA

www.harrahsrincon.com

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Neighbors Up the River San Luis Rey, The Rincon Indian Nation and their Great New Entertainment Centre, Pauma Valley, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Mida Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors Up River San Luis Rey to pauma Valley, The Rincon Indian nation Peoples and Their Harrah's Entertainment Center, Southern California USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors Up River San Luis Rey at Pauma Valley, and The Great Entertianment Venue Harrahs, Southern California USA

The Grand Entry & Porte Cochere

Entertainment & Gaming

Resort Amenities & Poolside View

    

In the fast-changing and highly competitive world in which guests have many entertainment choices, having a firm grasp of what we want to be and how we will get there are important for long-term success. In 2000, Caesars Entertainment, Inc., became the first casino company to adopt specific core principles to guide the way we interact with employees, guests and the communities in which we do business. These principles are called the Harrah’s Code of Commitment.

The Harrah’s Code of Commitment governs the conduct of our business. It is a public pledge to our guests, our employees and our communities that we will honor the trust they have placed in us:

A commitment to our guests to promote responsible gaming

A commitment to our employees to treat them with respect and provide them opportunities to build satisfying careers

A commitment to our communities to help make them vibrant places to live and work, and to market our casinos responsibly

The activities that support the Code are called Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs. At Harrah’s Rincon Casino & Resort (HRCR) our CSR programs are divided into several programs, with the primary focus on Charitable Giving, Volunteerism, CODEGREEN, and Responsible Gaming.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Neighbors the Pauma Indians, The First peoples Here, Pala, California USA Edgemon

www.paumabandofluisenoindians.com

 

BRIEF CULTURAL REPORT

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors the Pauma Native Peoples up River San Luis Rey at Pauma Valley, California USA

Place Where There is Water 

The Pauma Band's tribal affiliation is Luiseño, and we are one of the six "bands" of Luiseño people located throughout the mid-Southern California area. The designation "Luiseño," or its original form "San Luiseño," comes from the Mission San Luis Rey de Francia near present day Oceanside.

Most of the present day Luiseño peoples’ reservations are located on or near their traditional homelands. The reservations of Soboba and Pechanga in Riverside County as well as Pauma, Pala, La Jolla and Rincon in San Diego Country are the ancestral lands of our people, and the hope for our future. Collectively, we reference ourselves as the Payomkawichum or Western People.

 

Prior to European contact, conservative estimates say that the Luiseño population reached 15,000.  Major villages and gathering sites stretched from the Peninsular Ranges to the Pacific Ocean. The abundance of wildlife and plants on the land and in the water allowed the Luiseño to maintain a relatively sedentary lifestyle in the mild climate of Southern California.

The men hunted deer, antelope, rabbits, wood rats, ducks, quail, seafood and various insects. Hunters used bows and arrows, spear throwers, rabbit sticks, traps, nets, clubs and slings to catch game. Fishermen and traders used dugout canoes in the ocean and tule reed boats or rafts in the rivers and lakes. Family groups had specific hunting and gathering areas in the mountains and along the coast. Individuals from outside these groups only crossed the boundaries of these areas upon permission.

Women gathered seeds, roots, wild berries, acorns, wild grapes, strawberries, wild onions and prickly pear in finely woven baskets.  The Pauma and other Luiseño peoples are world renown for their expertise in coiled baskets made from the flora of the region.

At the heart of our traditional foods is wìiwish, a tasty ground acorn mush and healthy food staple rich in protein.  Evidence of acorn and seed processing and shellfish use dominates ancient sites throughout the Luiseño territory. The most visible evidence is the bedrock milling stone mortars used for processing seeds like acorns. These bedrock mortars sites are located throughout our region.

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors easterly the Pauma Band of Indians, Rich in Culture & History, Up the San Luis Rey River at Pauma Valley, California USA

THE TERRITORY

The traditional territory of the Luiseño people extends along the coast, from the north near San Juan Capistrano, south to the Encinitas/Carlsbad area and east to the valleys of the coastal mountains and Mt. Palomar.

Today this area is in northern San Diego, Riverside and Orange counties.

 

 

 

BRIEF ENTERPRISE REPORT

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors up River San Luis Rey, the Pauma Band of Indians and their New Entertainment Venue, a Casino at Pauma Valley, California USA

www.casinopauma.com

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Friends the Pauma up River San Luis Rey at Pauma Valley and They Have Big Plans for a Mega-Entertainment center in the Orange Groves at Pauma Valley, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's neighbors up River San Luis Rey at Pauma, The Great Pauma Indian Nation and a Big USA Flag on Their Sign, Pauma Valley, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors the Pauma Indians up River San Luis Rey at Pauma Valley, They have a Nice New Entertainment Centre, Too, at pauma Valley, California USA

Significant Resort Entertainment Planning

GOD Bless America

Welcoming Entry to Casino Pauma in The Grove

 

Casino Pauma is a North County favorite, because it’s smaller in size compared to the other casinos. This is a very appealing aspect for many people because big is not always better. You’ll also be greeted by a friendly door man with a smile and a warm greeting. Yes, Casino Pauma is a friendly place.

A palm tree-lined road greets guests to Casino Pauma and its comfortable 42,500-sq. ft. facility. More than 1,050 state-of-the-art slot machines are featured here at Casino Pauma along with exciting table games including poker, roulette, [$5] blackjack 24-hours a day, Lucky Lady’s Bonus Blackjack, Emperor’s Challenge Pai Gow Poker, and no limit Texas Hold ’em tournaments. The Poker Room opens at 5 p.m. Mon.–Thurs. and at 2 p.m. Fri.–Sun.

Federally recognized since 1891, and established in August of 1892, the Pauma Band is one of seven Bands of the Luiseño people located in San Diego and Riverside counties. The band has a rich history that goes back thousands of years.

Tribal lands of the Pauma Band consist of four [4] parcels of land equaling approximately 5,800 acres. In 1985, Pauma began its agriculture project with five [5] acres of Hass avocados. Currently, Pauma produces Hass avocados, Valencia oranges and lemons on approximately sixty [60] acres.

The Band opened Casino Pauma in May 2001, providing employment to the Tribal Members and the surrounding communities. Its revenues enhance the Tribal Government’s ability to meet the essential needs of the membership.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's neighbors the San Pasqual Peoples over at Valley View, Pala Creek, California USA

www.sanpasqualtribe.com

BRIEF CULTURAL REPORT

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Nilda's up River Neighbors, the San Pasqual Indian Nation, up River San Luis Rey at Valley Center, Some Culture & History, Southern California USA

THE KUMEYAAY HISTORY

The ancestors of the San Pasqual Indians lived for thousands of years in the valley carved by the Santa Ysabel Creek, where modern Highway 78 now winds, near the present site of the San Diego Zoo’s Wild Animal Park. After the arrival of the Spaniards and the establishment of Mission San Diego de Alcala in 1769, many Kumeyaay either left or were forced out of their ancestral homes, and were converted to Christianity. For most San Pasqual Indians, adopting parts of European culture did not mean the abandonment of Kumeyaay ways. Spanish religion, customs and language were merely added to the Kumeyaay traditions developed over thousands of years.

 

In 1821 the people of Mexico successfully concluded their revolution against Spain, gaining independence and proclaiming the Republic of Mexico. The Spanish outpost of Alta California became a Mexican territory, and the new government supported the breakup of the California missions. Arguments over the disposition of church lands however, delayed the closure of most missions for decades.

San Pasqual prospered as a Kumeyaay agricultural village for almost thirty years, and much of the credit must go to the leadership of Panto, the “capitan” of the band. The San Pasqual Indians made a cooperative stock raising agreement with neighboring Californio ranches, provided labor in exchange for cattle and horses, and were also recorded building a dam for a local rancher.

San Pasqual also served as a barrier against attacks by hostile bands. When men from neighboring ranches were absent from their homes, the women “at San Bernardo and at the Rancho of Jose Maria Alvarado remained due to the confidence they reposed in the Indians of San Pasqual,” and “whenever they felt any fear called upon Panto for the services of three or four Indians” to protect them. In 1837 a group of interior Indians led by a man named Claudio began raiding San Diego settlements, killing whites and Christianized Indians. In response, San Pasqual warriors under Panto found and attacked Claudio’s force, killing nine of his followers and capturing Claudio himself.

 

 

BRIEF ENTERPRISE REPORT

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Neighbors up tye River San Luis Rey, the San Pasqual Nation and their New Entertainment and Resort Establishment in Valley Center, California USA

www.valleyviewcasino.com

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's up River San Luis Rey Ol' Friends the San Pasqual Indians and Theit Hot New Resort Valley View in Valley center, California, USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's great Easterly Neighbors the San Pasqual Indian Nation Peoples and Their Hot New Resort Valley View, Gaming Too, at Valley Center, California USA
TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Neighbors up the River San Luis Rey to Valley Center, The San Pasqual Indian nation Peoples and Their Nice New Resort Knowns as Valley View, Southern California USA

Relaxing Entry to the Valley View Resort

The New Hotel Now Open

The Stately Valley View Entertainment Edifice

 

San Diego's Most Exciting Gaming Destination

Valley View Casino & Hotel is the ultimate gaming getaway! Combining the best in casino action with beautifully appointed rooms and breathtaking views, Valley View Casino is Southern California's most exciting casino hotel.

Plus, Valley View Casino & Hotel is an adults-only playground, with a 21 and older policy, meaning you truly get to relax and get away from it all! With San Diego's only Certified Loose slots, exciting table games, seven delicious restaurants, three bars and lounges, and free live entertainment nightly, Valley View Casino & Hotel is the place to play and stay.

Something to Satisfy Every Appetite

Take your pick from Valley View Casino’s many delicious dining options. Whether you are looking for a five-course meal or a quick bite before you get back onto your favorite slot machine, we’ll satisfy your appetite with fresh, tasty meals made by some of the top culinary talents in the country.

Valley View Casino & Hotel, Southern California's premier gaming destination, combines the thrill of San Diego's only Certified Loose slots and all your favorite table games with beautifully appointed rooms, seven delicious restaurants and first-class guest service. The casino features 2000 of the latest and greatest slot machines and 26 exciting tables including blackjack, roulette, baccarat, pai gow poker and more, as well as a complete non-smoking casino in addition to the main casino floor.

Delicious dining options include the award-winning lobster buffet, the Black&Blue steakhouse and lounge, BLD's café, Scoops gelato shop, Sweets pastry shop, Stix Asian noodle bar and Snax 24-hour snack shop. With three bars and live entertainment nightly, there's always something fun going on at Valley View Casino & Hotel. The casino hotel features 12 Luxury Suites and 96 Deluxe Rooms all featuring breathtaking views and complimentary poolside breakfast. To enjoy the casino, hotel and restaurants, guests must be 21 or older.

For more information about Valley View Casino & Hotel
CALL
760.291.5500

 

 

 

 

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's great Neighbors up River San Luis Rey at CValley Center, The San Pasqual Indian Nations People, They have been here a looooooong time. Southern California USA

THE SAN PASQUAL RESERVATION FIRE DEPARTMENT

TBNC Edgemon Milda Town at Pala Creek, Milda's Great Easterly Neighbors the San Pasqual Indian Nation, up the River San Luis Rey, with an Outstanding Fire Department to serve the Indian Nations, Southern California USA

The San Pasqual Reservation Fire Department was established in 1998.

As of December 01, 2006, the fire department has eighteen [18] paid personnel and fifteen [15] paid reserves.

The fire department at this time has a 2004 Type I HME Engine with 1000 Gallon Capacity, and a 2000 Type II International with a 500 gallon capacity. Also on staff, a Type I and Type III reserve Engine and one command vehicle.

As the San Pasqual Reservation Fire Department, we are dedicated to Fire Prevention, Life Safety and training. We are proud to serve the San Pasqual Indian Reservation and surrounding communities, and we respect the ways and traditions of all the people we care for.

We are grateful and proud to be part of this community and will continue to do our best for all we serve.

 

 

 

 

 

Return to HOME PAGE Milda Town at Pala Creek, USA

 

TBNC COLLABORATORS

an interdisciplinary planning & design collaboration

www.TBNC-California.com

7040 AVENIDA ENCINAS · SUITE 104.299
CARLSBAD · CALIFORNIA 92011.4652

760.729.9231  CORPORATE   ·   760.434.5869  FACSIMILE

 

 

ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING

Environmental Planning concerns itself with the decision making processes where they are required for managing relationships that exist within and between natural systems and human systems. Environmental Planning endeavours to manage these processes in an effective, orderly, transparent and equitable manner for the benefit of all constituents within such systems for the present and for the future. Present day Environmental Planning Practices are the result of continuous refinement and expansion of the scope of such decision making processes.

Some of the main elements of present day environmental planning are:

Social & Economic Development / Urban Development & Redevelopment / Regional Development / Natural Resource Management & Integrated Land Use / Infrastructure and Intermodal Interconnectivity Systems / Governance Framework

The environmental planning assessments encompass areas such as land use, socioeconomics, transportation, economic and housing characteristics, air quality and air pollution, noise pollution, the wetlands, habitat of the endangered species, flood zones susceptibility, coastal zones erosion, and visual studies among others, and is referred to as an Integrated Environmental Planning Assessment [IEPA].

In the United States, for any project, environmental planners deal with a full range of environmental regulations from federal to state and city levels, administered federally by the Environmental Protection Agency [EPA].

A rigorous environmental process has to be undertaken to examine the impacts and possible mitigation of any construction project. Depending on the scale and impact of the project, an extensive environmental review is known as an Environmental Impact Statement [EIS], and the less extensive version is Environmental Assessment [EA]. Procedures follow guidelines from National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA], State Environmental Quality Review Act [SEQRA] and/or City Environmental Quality Review [CEQR], and other related federal or state agencies published regulations.

The Association of Environmental Professionals (AEP) is a non-profit organization of interdisciplinary professionals including environmental science, resource management, environmental planning and other professions contributing to this field. AEP is the first organization of its kind in the USA, and its influence and model have spawned numerous other regional organizations throughout the United States. Its mission is to improve the technical skills of members, and the organization is dedicated to "the enhancement, maintenance and protection of the natural and human environment". From inception in the mid 1970s the organization has been closely linked with the maintenance of the California Environmental Quality Act [CEQA], due to California being one of the first states to adopt a comprehensive legal framework to govern the environmental review of public policy and project review.

 

 

Return to HOME PAGE Milda Town at Pala Creek, USA

 

 

an interdisciplinary planning & design collaboration

www.TBNC-California.com

7040 AVENIDA ENCINAS · SUITE 104.299
CARLSBAD · CALIFORNIA 92011.4652

760.729.9231  CORPORATE     ·    760.434.5869   FACSIMILE

 

 

© 2008-2018 COPYRIGHT

All components and elements depicted within this publication, including the design, configuration, narrative and discussions,
and the presentation in abstract, unless otherwise stated, is the sole property of TBNC.

Copyright and other Intellectual Property Laws protect this material.

Reproduction or transmission of this material, in whole or in part, in any manner, without the prior written consent
of the copyright holder, is a violation of copyright law.